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You Know We’re Right: Confused and clueless about classes?

Published: November 4, 2011
Section: Features


Dear Leah and Morgan,

I just finished my first semester and it’s time to choose classes for next semester. I liked my classes this year but I didn’t really love any of them (Intro to Econ, Intro to Psych, UWS and a NEJS class). I thought I wanted to be a Psychology major but I don’t think so anymore. I’ve picked a few classes just so I don’t waste my appointment slots but I’m not very excited about them and I want to switch. How should I go about picking classes with no major?

Sincerely,

Stressed About Spring

Dear Stressed,

Wait, you didn’t like UWS? Why not? Just kidding … we feel you. Here are our tips for a killer schedule:

Ask aroundDear Leah and Morgan,

I just finished my first semester and it’s time to choose classes for next semester. I liked my classes this year but I didn’t really love any of them (Intro to Econ, Intro to Psych, UWS and a NEJS class). I thought I wanted to be a Psychology major but I don’t think so anymore. I’ve picked a few classes just so I don’t waste my appointment slots but I’m not very excited about them and I want to switch. How should I go about picking classes with no major?

Sincerely,

Stressed About Spring

Dear Stressed,

Wait, you didn’t like UWS? Why not? Just kidding … we feel you. Here are our tips for a killer schedule:

Ask around

What have your friends taken? Especially talk to older students. Even if you’re not good friends, people are generally willing to rave about the classes and teachers they’ve loved and rant about the ones they’ve hated. You might have different interests but it’s a step in the right direction.

Review your requirements

Check out the list of university and distribution requirements, and see what you’ve already done. You don’t have to completely everything next semester, but looking at non-Western classes being offered might spark an interest and knowing you’re satisfying a requirement might make it even more enticing.

Balance it out

The best schedule combines a few different things. Initially, find a class you love. Try to get at least one or two that satisfy a university requirement. If you have a potential major or minor, take at least one class toward it. That way, either you’ll be one step closer to declaring or one step closer to knowing you want to switch majors. Take a class with someone you’ve heard is an amazing professor. The best professors can make obscure and boring topics interesting, and you might be able to get a mentor or adviser out of it. You might be tempted to take an easy-A class but search for a class that will challenge you as well—you don’t want to be too stressed in the spring, but there’s no point in wasting your tuition on classes you can sleep through.

Take what you love

Start by searching through classes until you find one that sounds interesting, whether it’s a topic you’ve studied previously, something you’ve always wanted to learn about or something of which you’ve never heard in your life.

The best way to pick a major (in our humble opinions) is the way we did it: Take a few semesters of interesting classes, make a spreadsheet to map everything out, and see what majors and minors you’re already on your way to completing. You might be surprised with what you end discover but don’t be discouraged if your results don’t match up with what you think your life plan is. For starters, your life plan can always change and the beauty of a liberal arts education at a university like Brandeis is that it prepares you not just for a career path but to be a productive, functioning member of society wherever you end up.

Best of luck!

Peace, love and good advice,

Leah and Morgan

Have questions that you want answered by the lovely ladies of The Hoot? Submit your questions to advice@thebrandeishoot.com or at formspring.me/leahandmorgan! They will be answered by Leah Finkelman ’13, Features Editor, and Morgan Gross ’14, Impressions Editor. We’re so excited to hear your questions!

What have your friends taken? Especially talk to older students. Even if you’re not good friends, people are generally willing to rave about the classes and teachers they’ve loved and rant about the ones they’ve hated. You might have different interests but it’s a step in the right direction.

Review your requirements

Check out the list of university and distribution requirements, and see what you’ve already done. You don’t have to completely everything next semester, but looking at non-Western classes being offered might spark an interest and knowing you’re satisfying a requirement might make it even more enticing.

Balance it out

The best schedule combines a few different things. Initially, find a class you love. Try to get at least one or two that satisfy a university requirement. If you have a potential major or minor, take at least one class toward it. That way, either you’ll be one step closer to declaring or one step closer to knowing you want to switch majors. Take a class with someone you’ve heard is an amazing professor. The best professors can make obscure and boring topics interesting, and you might be able to get a mentor or adviser out of it. You might be tempted to take an easy-A class but search for a class that will challenge you as well—you don’t want to be too stressed in the spring, but there’s no point in wasting your tuition on classes you can sleep through.

Take what you love

Start by searching through classes until you find one that sounds interesting, whether it’s a topic you’ve studied previously, something you’ve always wanted to learn about or something of which you’ve never heard in your life.

The best way to pick a major (in our humble opinions) is the way we did it: Take a few semesters of interesting classes, make a spreadsheet to map everything out, and see what majors and minors you’re already on your way to completing. You might be surprised with what you end discover but don’t be discouraged if your results don’t match up with what you think your life plan is. For starters, your life plan can always change and the beauty of a liberal arts education at a university like Brandeis is that it prepares you not just for a career path but to be a productive, functioning member of society wherever you end up.

Best of luck!

Peace, love and good advice,

Leah and Morgan

Have questions that you want answered by the lovely ladies of The Hoot? Submit your questions to advice@thebrandeishoot.com or at formspring.me/leahandmorgan! They will be answered by Leah Finkelman ’13, Features Editor, and Morgan Gross ’14, Impressions Editor. We’re so excited to hear your questions!