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Not just a Republican; an American above all

Published: November 17, 2006
Section: Opinions


I am an American first, a conservative second, and a Republican third. Because I am one of the biggest Republicans on campus (I hope you got the pun!), I wish to state my views regarding the recent midterm elections. Many have teased me and made jokes about the Democratic rise to power in both houses of the legislature. They believe that this somehow offends me, and that I should believe that a catastrophic turn of events will ensue now that the Democrats are in control. I am writing now to say that my core beliefs, my values that transcend partisanship and superficial politics, go to the core of Americanism itself. And it is these opinions that make me satisfied that my country will continue to be in safe hands.

Above all else, I consider myself a patriot. American citizenship is my most prized possession and I love my country more than any earthly possession or worldly property. I also respect and admire my countrymen, people who have shown unbelievable courage, triumph, and other noble traits in the pursuit of creating the freest society on the face of the Earth. I shall always trust the majority opinion of my fellow citizens. I believe that despots shall never step their tainted heel on the beloved soil of my country. I know that Americans are righteous people who are equipped to make good decisions concerning our country and its policy. My faith and confidence in the American people allows me to sleep comfortably knowing that I have a constant safeguard against injustice. I am sure of the intentions of the electorate and I hold the judgment of Americans to be praiseworthy indeed.

Another reason why I welcome the recent elections is that it will inevitably have a beneficial effect on America. Of course, the conservative policies that I believe will proliferate American interest will have a harder time getting initiated, but other consequences insure a positive outcome from the recent election. Gridlock and divided government are never bad when trying to ensure a system of checks and balances in modern democracy. Having a way to create oversight ensures that policies will come under review. This system is far better since it allows for more voices to be heard, a larger check on the executive, and invariably a better nation for all of us. Gridlock may have even been a reason for the Democratic victory, and insures a greater governmental oversight.

Finally, I believe that this new change in the legislature will create a larger movement of bipartisanship in policy initiatives. As can be seen with Speaker Nancy Pelosi visiting President Bush, reaching across the aisle will now be necessary to pass many initiatives in congress. This is a wonderful turn of events since it diminishes the current trend of cutthroat politics and partisanship that is riddling the present system. Now, more consensus is necessary and politicians will have to work together to make legislation established. This eliminates negatives in the status quo and initiates a movement that is beneficial to the country as a whole.

Though I am still a Republican and one who would like to see conservative proposals initiated, I am foremost a patriot. I have full faith and confidence in my countrymen and their majority opinion. Furthermore, many positive ramifications can result from the recent election cycle. More gridlock will ensue, making democracy more consensual and fair. This will allow an increase in the number of actors in Washington and be beneficial to the political process.

Furthermore, if I am not being overly-optimistic, partisanship may understandably decrease. A spirit of working together is now necessary, and this will move the country forward and away from negative realities in the status quo. I am a patriot and love my country dearly. We have the benefit to live in the most free and just society in the world. And although my views may not be the majority opinion soon to be represented in the houses of Congress, I know that the sacred values of Americanism will continue to flourish nonetheless.