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Registrar considers snow day make-ups

Published: February 4, 2011
Section: Front Page


Following Wednesday’s snow day and resulting canceled classes, the registrar’s office is considering using the study day scheduled before finals period as well as weekend days or late nights to make up the missed classes, an unprecedented measure in the 14 years that Mark Hewitt has been registrar.

“The academic administration is reviewing options for making up classes missed as a result of snow cancellations and delays. Further information will be available once that review is completed. Please remember that faculty may ask the registrar’s office to try to reschedule missed classes,” Senior Vice President of Communications Andrew Gully wrote in an e-mail to the student body on Wednesday morning.

Many professors have chosen to reschedule classes on their own but the registrar’s office has offered their assistance while they review the options for a university wide rescheduling. The registrar’s office is able to run reports on students’ class schedules in order to find a time in which all students of a particular class are free.

As Hewitt explained, this becomes increasingly difficult as class size increases. This system is also not able to factor in extra curricular activities.

“Realistically it is very difficult, almost impossible, to find a time that everyone is free,” Hewitt said.

The provost, president and the registrar’s office will ultimately decide whether to reschedule classes. However, their concern right now is the possibility of having more weather related cancellations with reports predicting more winter storms for the upcoming weeks.

“The thing they don’t teach you in new president school is that you’re actually the one who decides to cancel school or not and gets the call at four-thirty in the morning,” President Lawrence said.

Informal rescheduling of classes by professors are not technically obligatory, but “students have paid for this time so you’d hopefully think they would want to use it,” Hewitt said.